Monday, February 3, 2014

Fermented Blueberry Jam (Probiotic and Vegan)


I found the directions for the fermented berries from Oh Lardy - who I think get their inspiration from Nourishing Traditions.

Fermented Jam from Fresh Blueberries

12 oz (about 2 cups) of fresh blueberries (preferably organic)
2 tbsp of raw honey (optional)
1-2 tbsp culture from a previous ferment like sauerkraut (or whey but it is from milk so I don't use it, or some sort of starter culture you can buy online)
1/4 tsp salt (I use Himalayan pink salt)
filtered water

1. Put the berries into a wide mouth pint size mason jar or a Pickl-it jar.
2. Press the berries down with your washed hands or with a wooden spoon or something similar. It is ok to if the berries structure break a little bit and the juice starts oozing out. You can also puree them if you like.
3. Mix all the other ingredients in a cup and pour in the jar.
4. Fill jar with filtered water to the shoulder or little below. Leave about an inch room, otherwise your fermenting jam might climb out of your jar or your jar burst as the pressure builds up.
5. Press the berries down with a spoon or your fist. All the berries should be under water for them to ferment well and to avoid unwanted bacteria or mold from developing. You can use a small plate, a clean rock or a plastic bag filled with water as a weight to keep the berries under the brine. If you use an airlock system like the Picklit, it is not as critical to keep them under water. The fermenting time is much shorter in this type of ferment as well than in fermented vegetables so I think in general the under the brine rule in this is not as critical. I have made condiments like ketchup and mustard I keep out for a couple of days only and they are not under the brine. If you puree the berries you won't be able to keep them under the brine.

6. Put the lid (and airlock if using) on and leave to room temperature for 24-48 hours. Don't keep it out longer as it can turn alcoholic. If your room temperature is really high, shorten the fermenting time. The jam is ready when there are some bubbles and the berries taste a little bit sour.

7. Move to the fridge. It will keep a couple of months. 

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