Friday, December 19, 2014

Christmas Story Massage

I would like to wish you and your family lots of peace, joy and happiness this holiday season. I hope you can find time to relax and connect with your children. Remember that you and your mindful presence is their best gift!


I wrote today a story massage. It is not the first one I have written but it is the first one I am sharing publicly so I am a little bit nervous. Please send me feed back! It is a Christmas story BUT if you don't celebrate Christmas, you can just leave out the word Christmas and it will magically turn into a non-Christmas story! It can be used like this during the rest of the year too. I wrote this story to help my little boy feel safe when he is going to sleep. He has been afraid of ghosts lately. I hope you'll enjoy it.


(Christmas) night in the forest
A tactile story for children
Written by Sirpa Kaajakari, 2014

Follow the instructions below to draw the story on your child’s back to help them sleep, feel safe and to connect with them. Always ask permission before starting. Use gentle strokes avoiding pressure on the spine and kidneys in the low back. For more information go to www.kaikulifestyle.com

A big old spruce tree stood in the forest. Its roots were planted deep in the ground, its trunk was thick and sturdy and its branches were wide and green. The sap from the tree smelled so fresh. (Using the palms of your hands start from the low back and draw a tree with lots of branches on the back.)

The tree was a home for birds and squirrels. They felt safe in the old tree and ate the seeds from the cones and the bugs that crawled on the trunk. (Draw small circles with the tips of your fingers on the back.)

Foxes hid under the tree when it was raining. (Rest your hands on the low back.)

Hikers who needed to rest their tired legs sat under the tree and leaned against the strong trunk of the tree and enjoyed the peace of the forest. (Stroke with your hands on both sides of the spine starting from the low back.)

On Christmas night (or replace with “At night”) stars were bright and the moon lighted the forest. (Sprinkle stars all over the back with your finger tips.)

An owl sat on the branch of the old spruce tree, alert and awake when everyone else was sleeping. Keeping an eye on everything so the others could sleep peacefully. (Gently squeeze the shoulders.)

The wind gently brushed the tree branches and whispered: You are safe. (Draw whirly wind all over the back.)

One star fell from the sky but the tree caught it and the star got stuck on the top of the tree. From there it shone brightly, bringing peace and happiness to everyone in the forest. (Stroke the head and run your hands down to the upper back and rest them there.)

Read more about the benefits of story massage for children here

For information about story massage and relaxation classes for children go to www.kaikulifestyle.com

Saturday, December 6, 2014

Interview with Angie Alt, author of Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook.

Happy Finnish Independence Day! The republic of Finland is today 97 years old. I will be thinking of my home country and friends and relatives today. It also is my husband's birthday and we will be cooking paleo supcakes today (shh!)!

Today I ALSO have the honor of interviewing the lovely Angie Alt, the author of the brand new Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook (both in print and ebook!) who is on her virtual book tour this week. Today she is stopping by at Kaiku Lifestyle! Angie is a blogger and a health coach. Check out her website Alt-ernative autoimmune.


SIRPA: Hi Angie! Thanks for virtually stopping by! :) I enjoyed reading your beautiful cook book and I think it is so well needed and welcome in the AIP community! I miss having cook books that I can actually cook from without coming up with substitutions for every other ingredient. The recipes look delicious, can't wait to try them!

ANGIE: I'm so glad you like it!! It was a major labor of love.

SIRPA: It sure looks like labor of love! Your cook book and website say Alternative Autoimmune. What is behind the name?

ANGIE: My last name is Alt, so Alternative is a play on my name. The whole AIP movement is really about finding other ways, different ways . . . alternatives to heal autoimmune issues, so I've always liked to think of it that way.

SIRPA: Makes sense! You say AIP can give dramatic results. Could you describe shortly the dramatic change you experienced yourself? What made it worth it?

ANGIE: The very first change I noticed when I started AIP in May 2012 was a very big shift in the severity of anxiety I was experiencing. I went from constant anxiety, panic attacks and needing medication to being completely fine in terms of the anxiety struggle within three days. That dramatic change made me feel continuing the protocol to achieve other healing was worthwhile.

SIRPA: That is amazing! In your book you give instructions for the elimination phase and instruct in eliminating foods little by little week by week. Why not eliminate all at once? If you plan to be on the diet only for the 30 days, won't the last ones be away from your diet for only a very short time in that case?

ANGIE: I am a certified health coach and I noticed very early in my practice that many of my clients were really overwhelmed and stressed by starting all the eliminations at once. The cold-turkey approach doesn't work for lots of folks. I started developing a way to ease in and found my clients experiencing tons more success. In most cases, 30 days is not a long enough elimination period. That said, once you reach the final elimination is when your "full elimination period" begins, whether you need 30 days or more.

SIRPA: Ok. I did cold turkey and it was intense! I might try your method too as I have slipped some from the AIP and feel it. I did just 30 days when I started and I was in rush to introduce foods back (maybe because I went cold turkey!). If you (not me of course but HYPOTHETICALLY) reintroduce... say... coffee, chocolate and red wine the first week despite all your good intentions, how to get back on track?

ANGIE: I would take them all back out, give your system at least a week to reset (unless you've had a particularly bad reaction, then you might need more time) and then attempt reintroductions again, this time going more slowly. It is basically a big science experiment, where you are the guinea pig and your variables (the food) to be be carefully controlled for the best data.

SIRPA: Makes sense. I will keep that in mind next... I mean IF that would ever happen. Oh, I wanted to ask. I noticed you use tapioca in the recipes. I eliminated tapioca on AIP because it is cross reactive with gluten. What is your take on tapioca?

ANGIE: Tapioca is listed on the Cyrex labs Array 4 test for gluten cross-reactivity, however, tapioca is not eliminated on AIP. This is because not all the foods on the cross-reactivity list cause problems for every individual. It depends on the kinds of antibodies that your body forms. Tapioca, being on the gluten cross-reactive list, but not being out on AIP, makes it a good candidate to suspect though, if you find that you still don't feel well on AIP, especially if you consume tapioca regularly. Again, this is about fine-tuning and using the protocol to find your individual template over time.

SIRPA: Ok, thanks. I have done the Cyrex labs Array 4 test and my tapioca result was in the normal range. I think I might eliminated way many foods back then! I thought I was supposed to eliminate all gluten cross reactives. Good to know!

Have you ever tried any other healing protocols apart from AIP? If you have, how do they compare to AIP in your personal experience?

ANGIE: I have never tried anything else. Prior to trying AIP, I had no experience at all in altering my diet. It was desperation that made me try in the beginning, but soon I was sold on the healing it offered me.

SIRPA: If you would have to choose to be one AIP friendly food, which one would you be?

ANGIE: LOL! Hmmm? I've never thought of being a food. Maybe I'd be pork belly... It is insanely delicious.

SIRPA: LOL! Thanks so much, Angie! Good luck with everything!

ANGIE: Thanks for having me Sirpa!!

SIRPA: My pleasure. Have a great day! :)

Buy the book here.

Monday, December 1, 2014

The Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook by Angie Alt

I am very excited to share the news of this brand new cook book by Angie Alt of Alt-Ternative Autoimmune. I had the honor to read it already yesterday before the ebook was published this morning (a print version is coming out soon too!).

It was a great read about how to carry through the healing AIP diet where you first eliminate a lot of foods and then reintroduce them back one by one. I imagine this book is a great support when going on this diet. The recipes look delicious. I will post an interview with the author on Saturday! Check back to find out then what is behind the name in Alternative autoimmune, what to do if instead of reintroducing foods slowly one by one you introduce chocolate, coffee and red wine at once and which AIP friendly vegetable the author would choose to be if I made her choose.

The ebook version came out today and the print version will come out soon and you can order both through this link. If you buy it through my link it supports my work. :)

  • The ebook has 186 Pages (a lot!)
  • Price $17.00 (worth every penny)
  • 24 Meaty Main Recipes
  • 22 Soups & Sides Recipes 
  • 12 Drink & Desserts Recipes 
  • 3 Helpful Charts & a Food Journal 
  • Lots on "the journey" from illness to wellness with everything in-between (very interesting and helpful on my journey)

Sunday, November 30, 2014

New handy ebook to the rescue if you are starting healing AIP diet!


Any of you who have been following my healing journey probably remember my frustration in the beginning when I started AIP diet to get help with food sensitivities and blood sugar swings. As I replaced grains with piles of vegetables and fruit, I got actually more stomach symptoms. With some detective work, I quickly figured out it was because of FODMAP's that some fruit and veggies are really high in (read my post about it here). I went on a low-FODMAP diet and it really helped. After a while I was even able to eat more FODMAP foods.


My only problem was that I couldn't find a lot of sources for combining AIP with low-FODMAP. I wish I had had Christina Feindel's (acleanplate.com) new e-Book 28 days of low-FODMAP AIP at hand then! It includes amazing looking meal plans, shopping lists and recipes. The recipes seem easy and delicious.

One of my frustrations when starting the AIP was that - as much as I loved cooking - I felt I spent all my time in the kitchen cooking. Christina Feindel's book helps with this as she gives great tips how to save time in the kitchen. Just having all the meal plans and shopping lists feels very supportive when you are navigating the new diet and for sure saves time planning. Click here for more details. If you buy the book through my links, you also support my work as I get a commission. Thank you! And thank you to Christina for making this ebook to help us all who are trying to heal ourselves through diet!


Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Helping children with story massage after the tsunami in 2012 in Japan (interview of Mary Atkinson)

I taught story massage today in Family Room in San Marino so it is a great day to share the interview of some true story massage veterans who have taken story massage even to Japan to help children in the aftermath of the tsunami in 2012. I am honored to present you the interview of Mary Atkinson who with her partner Sandra Hooper teach story massage in England. Read the inspiring story of these incredible women and their valuable and inspiring work.


You and Sandra Hooper have been teaching story massage in the UK for many years. What is your story? How did it all start?

Sandra and I first met in 2005 when I was researching information for my book Healing Touch for Children. Sandra is an experienced Massage in Schools Instructor and I was a student on her course. We both shared a real passion for the power of Story Massage and felt an instant bond. We worked together on several other projects together. Then in 2012, I was invited to work with the children who had been affected by the devastating tsunami in Japan. Story Massage seemed the best way to introduce the healing power of touch to these traumatised children. I approached Sandra and other health professionals to write a story massage especially for the children. 
The story proved so popular and beneficial that Sandra and I wanted to share the benefits, and the joy, of Story Massage with as many children and adults as possible, all around the world. We now run accredited training courses, and we have written a book, eBook and produced a DVD. Our books and DVD are called Once Upon a Touch… Story Massage for Children.

How many people have you trained?

We have only been running our courses for a year but we have trained around 250 people already. Our diaries are filling up for next year too with courses around the UK including in-house training days in schools and hospices. We have invitations to teach in Denmark, USA and France. It seems to be gathering its own momentum as people realise the amazing benefits and possibilities of such a simple and positive activity. 

Where do the people you trained use story massage - at home, schools, other facilities?
We have been so humbled by the range of areas where Story Massage is making a real difference. People attend our courses and then use Story Massage in their place of work using their own expertise and experience. People use it at home with their own children and grandchildren, and it can be helpful for bonding when children are adopted and fostered. It is used in schools and in special schools, and with adults and children with learning difficulties or physical disabilities. It has also proved really beneficial in hospice settings with children facing the end of their life where Story Massage brings comfort not only to the children themselves but also their families. Disadvantaged teenagers find that sharing positive touch in a safe atmosphere can be helpful for raising self-esteem, and it has been part of Brownie activities, Harvest Festival in churches, baby massage classes and even within physiotherapy sessions. Every course we run seems to bring new possibilities and avenues to explore. At the end of November, I am travelling further afield and will take Story Massage to a children’s home in Nepal.

What kind of feedback have you gotten from your students after they have started using story massage in their work or homes?


The feedback has been so positive, sometimes it is hard to believe that something so very simple and enjoyable can bring such profound benefits. People are always so pleased that they have an activity that they can use immediately after the day course. We often get comments from parents and grandparents saying that their child loved the story massage and wanted more and more…! Health professionals are delighted to have an activity that does not require any preparation, funding or sterilization. Teachers find that Story Massage has a calming impact in the classroom, and can easily be used as a creative activity within the school curriculum.

Could you share one positive experience (I am sure you have many!) with story massage that has touched you?

Am I allowed to describe two!

Firstly, there is a charity called The Chernobyl Children’s Lifeline which offers children from the Chernobyl Disaster area some respite, good food and healthcare for four weeks every year. One of the problems is the language barrier, and also initial ‘bonding’ with their host families in the UK. For the past three years we have introduced a Welcome to the UK Story Massage on their first day to help break down the barriers through positive touch. It has always proved successful and provided a lot of fun and laughter. However, last year we were so pleased to discover that the children had been sharing massage not only within their host family homes, but also in a supermarket! (see photo). The children took the story massage back to their own families – and so the power of touch keeps spreading.
Secondly, we took story massage to a school assembly of 330 children aged 10 -11 years, and the outcome was really heartwarming. As background information, as I mentioned before, I was part of a project that took Story Massage to the tsunami area of Japan. This was instigated by a wonderful Japanese charity called Cocoro (which means mind in Japanese) and founded by Takiko Ando, a Japanese aromatherapist who wanted to bring comfort and healing to the victims through positive touch.

The mental health of the survivors is still a real cause for concern and the charity continues its vital work in the area. One of the most important ways of supporting the local people is by sending letters or photographs to show they are still remembered by people all around the world.

Part of my role as Cocoro UK representative is to co-ordinate these awareness-raising activities. We were invited to run a school assembly and introduce The Smiling Flowers Story Massage to the children. It was just so amazing to watch 330 children, boys and girls, all massaging each other (see photo). The teachers commented that they rarely saw the children so well behaved, focused and gentle with each other! Then, totally unprompted, they wrote beautiful hand-written letters to the children in Japan. The letters were translated to Japanese and delivered by the charity to the schools and kindergartens. It was chain of compassion, connection and caring that was sparked by the power of touch through Story Massage.

Because of my own work with story massage, I am curious about your method! In your method you teach a set of strokes to use with stories. Do you find it is easier for people to have this tool pack of strokes than to improvise?
Definitely. We organized several ideas workshops with a range of professionals and parents to devise the most effective way of sharing Story Massage with people who have no massage background. We introduce ten basic strokes that can be used to cover a range of different actions and objects within a story massage. One stroke is called The Circle, for example, and this could depict the sun, a cake, the world or children dancing in a circle…. the list goes on. We teach and share these ten strokes and spend time discussing the various objects and actions before people begin to adapt stories or create their own.

For many people, the creative process can be quite daunting and these ten strokes offer a starting point to help build confidence. Each stroke has its own symbol, and this becomes an international language. You can see video clips of our ten basic strokes on our website.

Which is your favorite story? Could you share it with my readers?
Personally, my favourite story is The Smiling Flowers because this marked the start of our Story Massage project. We had no idea where it would lead when we first wrote it. The Smiling Flowers Story Massage is available to download from our website www.storymassage.co.uk when you subscribe to our free e-newsletter.

What are the most important benefits of story massage in your opinion?
Story massage offers a simple, fun and interactive way of sharing the benefits of positive touch with children of all ages and abilities. The benefits will vary depending on the situation, whether at home, in the classroom or other location, and also the responses and particular needs of the individual child, but may include:
  • The relaxation of mind and body, easing tension and the cumulative effects of stress. 
  • The promotion of ‘feel­good’ hormones including oxytocin, which helps to boost general well­being. 
  • The opportunity for children to have dedicated ‘calming time’. 
  • Learning the essential life skill of conscious relaxation through first­hand experience of recharging and refreshing mind and body. 
  • Improved alertness and concentration. 
  • Reduction of aggressive and hyperactive behaviour. 
  • An increased sensitivity by children of how their own actions and emotions can influence those of others. 
  • Increased self­confidence, self­awareness and self­esteem. 
  • An alternative and engaging way of encouraging children to develop a wider vocabulary. 
  • The opportunity for children to engage in experiences that provide a context for the use of emotional language. 
  • Individual attention that enhances a child’s awareness of being valued, and brings a sense of self­worth. 
  • The opportunity for families and friends to share time together – having fun, connecting and developing the imagination. 
Thank you for sharing your story. I enjoyed reading it and learning how much valuable work you have done so far and I am sure there is more to come!

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Why story massage is great for kids

Photo: Hello Pinecone Photography

I can't believe I haven't written anything on my blog about the biggest thing in my life right now (apart from our food adventure of course)! Remember how last spring I went and got certified in pediatric massage by Tina Allen from Liddle Kidz Foundation? (I wrote a travel paleo/AIP food post about my trip, you can read it here.)

My budding pediatric massage therapist career evolved quickly and spontaneously into teaching story massage. What is story massage, you ask. Very simply, in story massage you tell a story and "draw" it with your hand on someone else's, often a child's back. It is a great way to combine storytelling and nurturing touch with being present with your child. The kids love it!

There are many benefits of story massage but here are few:


  • Massage releases the so called "feel good hormones" and lowers stress hormones and helps relax, sleep, focus, grow, learn and stay healthy and happy. (This is all research based by the way, so you don't have to take my word for it!)
  • Oxytocin, the love hormone, is released, and it enhances bonding between the parent and the child. 
  • The mindful presence and positive touch give the child a message of being valuable and important and can increase their self esteem.
  • The mindful presence of the parent will fill the child's tank with love and security and can thus even prevent conflicts.
  • In the event of a conflict, story massage can provide a way to reconnect.
  • Stories can help to prepare the child for life changes, transitions or new situations.
  • Story massage can be a tool to process feelings. The story and your mindful presence and safe space can also inspire the child to share their thoughts or worries with you.
  • In Europe where story massage is used in schools and day cares, caretakers report story massage being a great tool to prevent conflicts and even bullying. Peer massage is used there too.
  • Asking permission to massage will teach the child that they have the right to say "no" if someone wants to touch them. It also models them about boundaries with their interactions with others - they should ask others before touching their bodies.
  • Pediatric massage teaches about healthy touch and also to ask for healthy touch.
  • Storytelling enhances imagination, listening skills, vocabulary and helps with reading. Massage helps to stay still to listen to the story (and vice versa!) and can be used to learn specific knowledge too - like drawing the numbers or letters on the back or just using descriptive strokes for an educational story made up from the topic the child wants to learn about will help them remember.

For more information about story massage and pediatric massage, check out my website.

Read my story how I ended up in story massage also from the website of this UK based wonderful story massage company.

More about story massage soon!

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Brussel Sprout Lover's Pan of Happiness


Did you know that in my native language, Finnish, brussel sprouts are called "rose cabbages"? I love that name! They do look like little cute baby cabbage heads. Anyway, this recipe is so good. You will love it, I promise! You will want to have this for breakfast, lunch and dinner. I do at least. If you ever meet someone who says they don't like brussel sprouts, offer them a taste of this dish! You might just convert them. Have I sold this recipe to you yet?


I loooove brussel sprouts in all forms so who am I to say though, but I have heard a lot of sighs of happiness from people eating this food. This is the best brussel sprouts recipe I know of.  What is your favorite way of preparing brussel sprouts? Please share in comments!

I usually buy sugar free and additive free delicious bacon from US Wellness Meats, for this day's version I had to use alternate bacon as they have been out, the bacon is so good. I am a part of their affiliate program so if you buy yours through my link above you support my blog! Thank you!

Delicious Sauteed Brussel Sprouts 

1/2 lb bacon 
a couple of pounds of brussels sprouts
1/2 lbs of mushrooms (optional)
1 big clove of garlic
1/3 cup of broth (I make my own delicious and healthy broth, learn how you can, too!)
1/3 cup coconut milk
2 tbsp creamed coconut
salt to taste

1. Prepare the brussels sprouts. Wash them, cut the hard bottom part off, remove any too wilted outer leaves and cut the sprouts in half.
2. Wash mushrooms and cut them in half. Very small ones you can keep whole.
3. Cut bacon in small pieces.
4. Brown the bacon pieces in a large skillet on medium heat. Add garlic and stir.
5. Add brussels sprouts and mushrooms and toss them in the bacon fat for a couple of minutes.
6. Add broth, coconut milk and creamed coconut and simmer on low until the brussels sprouts are as soft as you like them. Mix every now and then to prevent anything from burning. Add more liquid if it all evaporates to prevent the dish from burning.
7. Enjoy alone or with friends!

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Passion fruit coconut milk ice cream (dairy free)

I love living in Southern California. Here it happens every so often (or is it just me?!) that a friend or a neighbor give you veggies or fruit from their garden or tree because they just have too much for their own use. Yesterday I got eight pieces of passion fruit. From a friend's tree! I made an ice cream of it to serve them and another family tonight. It tuned out very very yummy. Here is the recipe.

3 cups coconut milk
6 passion fruit pulp, peels and seeds removed
1 peach (optional)
1 tsp vanilla 
1/4-1/2 tsp salt
3 tbsp raw honey

Mix in a blender and use your ice cream maker to magically turn it into some yummy ice cream!

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Packing a healthy real food school lunch is super simple.

Grilled chicken, olives, pomegranate and rutabaga sticks.

No-one brings lunch to school in Finland. The lunch is provided by the public school (most children attend public school) for free - well, not free, but paid by everyone's taxes. I grew up eating warm home cooked meal type school lunches in Finnish school cafeteria: Fish soup, ground beef soup, cabbage casserole, meat sauce and potatoes, meat balls and mashed potatoes, liver casserole, spinach pancakes and blood pancakes with lingonberry preserves (yes, you read that right). You can find a lot of those recipes from my other blog Rootlicious.

Here in the US I pack my children's school lunches and snacks (I still don't get it why they would need a snack in between breakfast they've had right before school at home and school lunch, it is just a few hours and the snack just spoils the appetite for lunch in my humble opinion). I pack them mostly paleo foods and the lunch consists of a protein (meat, mushrooms or nuts or seeds), a serving of vegetables and a serving of fruit or berries. Leftovers from last night's dinner are great. For snack I add one serving of veggies, fruit or nuts.


I use a bento box type lunch box with compartments to separate the different foods. My favorites are Planet Box and Lunch Bots. They are durable stainless steel lunch boxes with compartments and they are free from plastic (which I am afraid can contain chemicals that leach in to the food). I pack the stainless steel box in an insulated lunch bag.

Cucumber slices, spinach plantain pancakes,
water melon and blackberries in a Lunch Bots.
Packing a paleo school lunch is super simple. Even your children can do it themselves and save you a lot of work. They actually can find it fun to pack their own lunch starting from chopping vegetables or fruit. Even my three year old can chop most veggies and fruit with a knife. I like to give them sharp knives instead of dull ones (in fear of them hurting themselves) because the dull knives slip easier and can hurt them too. It feels good to use a proper knife and with supervision even very small children can totally do it. I also often leave vegetables or fruit whole, they don't always need to be chopped. An apple or banana are in perfect packages as they are!

Pick one from each category below and put them in a bento box. You can of course use two or more different kinds of fruit or berries or vegetables at once.

Spinach pancakes with apple sauce and
prosciutto wrapped grilled mushrooms

Category 1: Protein
I prefer to buy organic, grass fed and sustainable and without additives.


  • Ground beef patty in lettuce wrap (fried the same morning)
  • Mushrooms wrapped in prosciutto or bacon grilled in toaster oven that morning
  • Nut butter with veggies or fruit
  • Nuts or seeds
  • Cooked/canned fish
  • Larabar
  • Epic bar
  • Cooked chicken strips (alone or with a Paleo wrap and guacamole, ground beef is nice with the wrap and guacamole too)
  • A grilled chicken drumstick
  • Lunch meat, liverwurst or fried bacon (some healthy options can be found from US Wellness Meats)
  • Cooked shrimp
  • Paleo fish sticks (click for a recipe - the same recipe can be used to make paleo chicken nuggets)
  • A boiled egg would be perfect if we didn't avoid eggs due to allergies.
  • Paleo meat balls
  • Peas
  • Green beans

TIP: Use tooth picks to pin liverwurst, lunch meat or sausage pieces together with cucumber slices

Category 2: Vegetables
I like to use seasonal veggies.


  • Spinach pancakes with apple sauce
  • Baby carrots or carrot sticks
  • Persian cucumbers (whole), or cucumber sticks or slices (a quick ranch dip can be made with coconut kefir, garlic, Herbamare, lemon, parsley)
  • Raw rutabaga or turnip sticks
  • Radishes
  • Steamed broccoli
  • Raw cauliflower florets
  • Sea weed
  • Guacamole (or is avocado technically a fruit?)
  • Olives
  • Salad
  • Pickles
  • Sauerkraut
  • Other fermented veggies


Category 3: Fruit/treat/dessert (or snack)
I like to use seasonal fruit and berries.


  • Blueberries/raspberries/blackberries/strawberries
  • A whole apple/peach/plum
  • Orange slices
  • Pieces of melon
  • A plantain pancake with Sunbutter (we use this one) or nut butter or homemade paleo "nutella" (add raw cacao powder to a nutbutter or use a recipe like this)
  • Strawberries with paleo "Nutella"
  • Apple sauce
  • Fermented apple sauce
  • Fruit salad with seasonal fruit
  • Grapes
  • Paleo muffins (Google for tons of recipes!)
  • Coconut balls (kids love to make these themselves)
  • Chocolate pudding from avocados


Remember to add an ice pack if you have packed meat. Don't forget water. We use stainless steel water bottles (we use this kind except always with a regular cap, sports caps and sippy cup caps worry me for mouth development issues). We pack a cloth napkin too. The kids can help sew those from leftover fabrics, or choose their own fabrics from the store. My son made a few spider napkins and they are his favorite. It is a nice touch to add a little love note, a joke or a fun fact for the kids who are learning to read. I make mine in our secret language, Finnish.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

I am on Paleo Diet Magazine!

My paleo camping food blog post was featured in the new Paleo Diet magazine!

You can check out the mag with me in it for free with coupon code PaleoMagVIP. The magazine is awesome!

Here is the link for iTunes.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/paleodiet-magazine-where-passion/id583344658?ls=1&mt=8

Here is a video on how to use the code:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUg5v6sn0TM

Or see the pic below for the three step process. If you need help with it, let me know!